Modifying DNA May Wipe Away Old Memories

Modifying DNA May Wipe Away Old Memories

Most of my growing as a person has been done dealing correctly with old traumatic memories. I feel this ability to erase our old memories will stunt our development as individuals and a species. Of course there would be a short term effect, no more bad intrusive memories to deal with. I suffered from PTSD from a traumatic childhood. The night terrors, flooding emotions, panic attacks, anxiety, inability to trust myself. I worked my way through these obstacles with tools I learned to use, meditation, discipline, mind training, diet, exercise, a good spiritual grounding as well. I am not an atheist.  I wouldn’t trade the growth I had dealing with these old memories for all the gold in the world. Remove these old memories I am gone as well and all my potential spiritual growth too.

However this would be a wonderful tool for employers who put their workers in dangers, people who profit from abusing others by putting them in dangerous situations.  Just wipe their memory and continue on! What a great tool to make us all happy machines to do the bidding of our masters. Or someone can zap your DNA to wipe ideas or inventions, secrets that will endanger established powers of control.

With lots of work I don’t have night terrors, panic attacks, flooding emotions, old haunting memories to bother me anymore. Each one of us has the ability to let go of the past. There isn’t one method to do this but for me vipassana meditation removed a lot of old triggers, not my old memories, but the triggers have been erased for good. I can remember my past when I want, I just don’t react to the old memories like I used too. That means I let the memories come up and pass away with equanimity and steady awareness. A couple years of work no more night terrors or flooding emotions and panic attacks.

Modifying DNA May Wipe Away Old Memories

17 January 2014 12:15 pm
Seeing the trees. A neuron from a traumatized mouse (left) sports fewer dendritic branches than does one from a mouse (right) that received behavioral (fear extinction) therapy, suggesting greater memory editing for the latter.Adapted from Johannes Gräff, et al., Cell (2014)Seeing the trees. A neuron from a traumatized mouse (left) sports fewer dendritic branches than does one from a mouse (right) that received behavioral (fear extinction) therapy, suggesting greater memory editing for the latter.

A clean slate—that’s what people suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) crave most with their memories. Psychotherapy is more effective at muting more recent traumatic events than those from long ago, but a new study in mice shows that modifying the molecules that attach to our DNA may offer a route to quashing painful memories in both cases.

One of the most effective treatments for PTSD is exposure psychotherapy. A behavioral psychologist asks a patient to recall and confront a traumatic event; each time the traumatic memory is revisited, it becomes susceptible to editing through a phenomenon known as memory reconsolidation. As the person relives, for example, a car crash, the details of the event—such as the color and make of the vehicle—gradually uncouple from the anxiety, reducing the likelihood of a panic attack the next time the patient sees, say, a red Mazda. Repeated therapy sessions can also lead to memory extinction, in which the fears tied to an event fade away as old memories are replaced with new ones.

Yet this therapy works only for recent memories. If too much time passes before intervention, the haunting visions become stalwart, refusing to budge from the crevices of the mind. This persistence raises the question of how the brain tells the age of a memory in the first place.

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